Skip to main content

About your Search

20140405
20141001
STATION
CNNW 74
DATE
April 52
May 19
June 2
July 1
LANGUAGE
English 74
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNN
Apr 15, 2014 10:00pm PDT
in if they feel they have to have them. so for now it is doing the job. >> and jeff wise, the bluefin did exactly what it was programmed to do, which is to come back up if it succeeds. it is approximately 15,000 foot maximum depth limit. what happens if it goes beyond that? because don't they design these submersibles to go a little deep are than their capability? >> well, certainly, they have a margin built in so it doesn't go beyond the capability and implode. but it has its limits. the ocean does get quite a bit deeper than it does at this particular spot. so in the event that it is much deeper than what it is operating at today they're going to have to call in other pieces of equipment that can go deeper. and fortunately these things do exist. >> david souci, do you think we may see manned subs down there, something like the alvin manned research sub machine? >> i think we well in the retrieval phase, but right now we're talking about those that are complimenting the search, and the only one that comes to mind is the remus that has the photography capability. that is what i would expect to se
CNN
Apr 16, 2014 10:00pm PDT
though there is a very large policy. >> jeff wise, as you watch all of this do you think the bluefin is up to the challenge and do you agree with arthur rosenberg that we need more assets out there? >> well, it certainly is encouraging on the third day of the mission, that was a good sign, maybe it was just teething pains to start out with. it is theoretically capable. there was talk that maybe this one was a reconditioned model. maybe it was purchased off a used car lot or something and it was not up to snuff. this is very encouraging, i think soon we'll hear the results, maybe we'll even get data that indicates the wreckage is there. it would be premature to jump on the bluefin right now and say it is not up to the task. i think we really have to see what comes up hopefully in the next few hours. >> stay with us everybody, if the plane is buried in silt or sand, will the bluefin be able to find it? we'll take a closer look after this. honestly, i'm pouring everything i have into this place. that's why i got a new windows 2 in 1. it has exactly what i need for half of what i thought
CNN
Apr 7, 2014 8:00pm PDT
colonel michael kay. jeff wise, the author of "extreme fear: the science of your mind in danger." jim tilmon, a retired american airlines pilot. and steven marks, an aviation attorney, who represents the families of another disaster, air france flight 447. again, we're expecting that news conference to happen at any moment now from the joint agency coordinate, center chief angus houston, along with a minister for defense, senator david johnson. geoffrey thomas, you're there in perth. >> am i still needed? >> yes, you are still needed. >> i'm still on. >> you didn't introduce me. i thought i was talking to your producer, i apologize. >> you need no introduction, bill nye. we're going to need you as well. >> we can find an airplane in the middle of the ocean, but we can't know whether or not we're on camera. >> that is your issue, at this point, bill nye. so thank you, we appreciate the comedic moment there. but let's get back to business. geoffrey thomas, you're there in perth. what k you tell us? richard and i are going back and forth about the significance of this particular news con
CNN
Apr 15, 2014 7:00pm PDT
them in as they feel they have to have them. so, for now it's doing the job. >> jeff wise, the the bluefin did exactly as programmed to do, to come up if it exceeds the depth limit. what happens if the plane is beyond that depth? don't they design submersibles to go a little further than their capabilities? >> sure. they have a certain margin so it doesn't go right to the margin of capability and implode. it has limits. it can't go infinitely deep and the ocean gets quite a bit deeper than it does at this particular spot. in the event it is much deeper than what it has been operating at today they are going to have to call in other pieces of equipment that can go in deeper. and unfortunately those cease to exist. >> do you think we will see manned subs down there, something like the alvin manned research submarine. >> i think eventually we will when we are in the retrieval phrase. right now we are talking about complementing the search and the only one capable of that has sonar and photography capabilities. that is what i would expect to see next if they don't see anything
CNN
Apr 23, 2014 7:00pm PDT
, cnn. >> all right. thank you very much. >>> time for my team of experts. jeff wise, author of "extreme fear: the science of your mind and danger." former faa safety inspector and author of "why planes crash." lieutenant colonel michael kaye, retired military pilot with the british royal air force. jim tillman, retired american airlines pilot, aviation attorney arthur rosenburg, and of course jeffrey thomas, back with us from perth. david, you say in jean's piece that additional countries coming forward to help could complicate efforts. what's the alternative, though? >> well, the idea is that as time -- there's a time in investigation when you stop doing and start thinking. that's important, really important. and most of the my investigations, i spent at least 80% of our time planning and figuring it out and analyzing data. and only about 20% do you actually go out and do. now, those investigations didn't involve this type of search, obviously. but with this type of search, it's so important that it's a coordinated effort. there's a strategy, a plan for it to go forward. throwing more
CNN
Apr 14, 2014 7:00pm PDT
phone conversation from the cockpit of an airplane in flight. >> jeff wise, a similar question i asked brett larson. i have heard up to 30% of cell phones aren't turned off during flights. do you buy that only one cell phone was on out of 239 people. let me preface this by saying, you can leave your cell phone on now in the united states but they ask you to put it in airplane mode. i'm not sure what the rules are in malaysia. but 30% of phones being on or not in airplane mode. what are the chances that just one was on? >> it seems really unlikely. who hasn't got on a plane and got off at the end and realize idea left my phone on the whole time? it seems really unlikely and the fact it was only picked up by one cell phone tower? so you know, the possibilities there seem rather strange. one thing that happened today, apparently the faa itself here in the united states just today introduced a new policy that the flight attendants aren't allowed to use their cell phones in flight which you would think they would have done already a long time ago. >> david, to you now, what's your take on i
CNN
Apr 10, 2014 8:00pm PDT
. i want to bring in my panel of experts. jeff wise, mary schavio, former inspector general of the department of transportation is now an attorney for victims of transportation accidents. lieutenant colonel michael kay, a former adviser to the u.k. ministry of defense. tim till mon, an american airlines pilot and fran townsend, homeland security adviser to president bush and geoffrey thomas in perth all back with me now. and clive irving. listen, guys, i have breaking news in to cnn. this is according to the associated press. richard will tell you what our affiliates in australia is reported. the associated press is reporting that this is breaking news from australian prime minister said the sermers are confident that it is coming from missing plane's black box. he says they are confident they are coming from missing plane's black box. geoffrey, you are in australia. -- hang on, richard -- >> it is pretty much the australian networks in some shape or form are reporting the same comment. i'm guessing the prime minister made comments entering or leaving a building. geoffrey, w
CNN
Apr 24, 2014 11:00pm PDT
't they? i will start in order. jeff wise. >> no. >> mary schavio. >> yes. >> mikey kay. >> no. >> jim tilmon. >> no. >> les abend? >> no. we have had this discussion before. >> yes, we have. >> arthur rosenberg? >> absolutely yes. no question about it. >> we will get in to the reasons why after this break. we have cameras everywhere these days. why not in the cockpit? my experts will tackle that question next. i've always kept my eye on her... but with so much health care noise, i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still gonna give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. here we go, everyone. cameras in the cockpit. it raises questions of privacy, safety and money. i want to start with our pilots. jim and les. a skeptic may say what are pilots doing in the cockpit they wouldn't want people to see. les, you first. >> thank you, don. i know we had a lively discussion about this frequently. you have to -- the question is what are we doing? are we increasing
to will the minute it comes out. >> let's bring in cnn aviation analyst jeff wise. where is the plane and what caused it to disappear, two questions that will likely not be answered in this report. >> well, right. i mean, that would be amazing but so unlikely. i mean, i think even if we take all of the information that's available to malaysian authorities, obviously, that doesn't add up to finding the plane, because they haven't done it, and it's really starting to seem increasingly unlikely that their current undertaking will. >> what, then, jeff, will you be looking for in this report? because this report has been highly anticipated by the families, by people who have investigated air disasters before. there will be some facts in there. so, what will be the first things you look for? >> very first thing we're looking for, and really, the brass ring we want to grab is that inmarsat data, that famous set of pings that is really our only clue to what ultimately happened to this plane. and if they've put in the full set of data with all the full accuracy that we believe that they have, that could be hu
CNN
Apr 24, 2014 8:00pm PDT
't they? i will start in order. jeff wise. >> no. >> mary schavischavio. >> yes. >> mikey kay. >> no. >> jim tilmon. >> no. >> les abend? >> no. we have had this discussion before. >> yes, we have. >> arthur rosenberg? >> absolutely yes. no question about it. >> we will get in to the reasons why after this break. we have cameras everywhere these days. why not in the cockpit? my experts will tackle that question next. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ gigantic, gigantic, gigantic ♪ a big, big love ♪ gigantic, gigantic, gigantic ♪ a big, big love ♪ ♪ feeding your lawn need not be so difficult neighbors. get a load of this bad boy. whoa. this snap spreader system from scotts is snap-crackin' simple -- just snap, lock, and go. [ scott ] feed your lawn. feed it! ...and let in the dog that woke the man who drove to the control room [ woman ] driverless mode engaged. find parking space. [ woman ] parking space found. [ male announcer ] ...that secured the data that directed the turbines that powered the farm that made the milk that went to the store that reminded the man to buy the milk that was po
lumpur. thanks so much. >> let's bring in jeff wise, cnn aviation analyst. so much is made of the 17 minutes, this gap before they realized the plane hadn't checked in with the vietnamese air -- and then four hours before they even started to sort of look for it. is that just the way the system is set up, or is this, you know, a lack of oversight on the part of the malaysians? >> well, you're going to expect that it takes a certain amount of time, first of all, to realize that they're not where they should be, and then to try to figure out, okay, well, where are they then? so, when you look at the transcript of the proceedings, you see that air traffic controllers in ho chi minh called malaysia, the malaysian air traffic people called the malaysian airlines, and there's calls going back and forth, basically saying, has anybody seen this? then there's a rumor that they're in cambodian air space. that took a little while to be disproved. so basically, imagine like if you were supposed to meet a friend for dinner and they didn't show up, then maybe you called their wife, you start to ca
CNN
Apr 16, 2014 7:00pm PDT
. maybe something we don't know about? jeff wise, as the search continues one possibility is that civilian contractors could take a larger role in the military effort. if that happens, would that change the search you think? >> well, i mean, as long as the resources continue to be committed the search will continue. it really boil s down to what information the authorities have, how confident they are this investment of resources and material will yield results. i think a lot of that will depend on what we find. as the prime minister said, i think the next week will be crucial. there's a fairly limited area on the seabed that corresponds to those pings. the tow pinger locater had a range of two miles so it should be pretty compact. i think what the prime minister said is fairly accurate. in the next week, we will know where the resources should be allocated. >> mary a question for you that is up your alley. how long will authorities continue with this active operation and will they stop at some point and have to make a decision on wl weighing the cost of a search like this. >> oh, absolute
CNN
Apr 17, 2014 11:00pm PDT
to bring in my experts. jeff wise, the author of "extreme fear: the science of your mind and danger." bill waldock is a professor of safety science at embry riddle aeronautical university. aviation attorney jim marks, jim tilmon, retired pilot, richard quest is back with me again. thank you, gentlemen. geoffrey, to you again. another promising lead and another dead end. was this oil slick found on top of the social a dead end? the analysis it wasn't connected to flight 370. did that surprise you? >> i guess it disappointed me a little bit. i guess it's not a surprise when we consider all of the rubbish that's in the ocean, the oil that's cast aside off of fishing boats, off larger ships. one of the things we have discovered, unfortunately, in this search is how much rubbish there is in the indian ocean and other oceans, as well, obviously. so there's a lot of hope attached to this that this would be an absolute definitive link to this airplane, but the confidence still remains very high that we are looking in the right place for mh-370, despite the setback with the oil. >> okay, so, bill,
CNN
Apr 19, 2014 7:00am PDT
have a aviation analyst, jeff wise, cnn aviation analyst and author of "extreme fear." sylvia pearl in residence national geographic society. let's continue with the conversation earlier. it sounds like all of you are in agreement that it means going back and reviewing a lot of the information, all of the data in this whole reassessment. it means trying to figure out what are the best tools. it means looking again if they're looking in the right place. so jeff, to you first. if there's a way in which to i guess use this current as much as a springboard, what at least has been gained from the way in which the search has been conducted so that they can figure out where to go from here? >> well, i think really a lot has been accomplished in the last -- we're in the sixth week now, over more than $30 million has been spent. >> what are the accomplishments? >> well, basically to eliminate where it is not because we've searched on the surface, it is a huge area of the southern indian ocean, found nothing. as time goes by, if the plane did crash in the ocean, you would expect to find a sig
CNN
Apr 22, 2014 10:00pm PDT
boxes and data recorders. i appreciate that. jeff wise, the author of "extreme fear: the science of your mind in danger." mary schavio, lieutenant colonel michael kay, a retired military pilot with the british royal air force. jim tilmon, david soucie author of "why planes crash." arthur rosenberg and geoffrey thomas editor and chief of airlineratings.com. this is the original group we assembled eight weeks ago and you are back here with us. thank you for joining us. we will start with you, jim. some families have been questioning whether searchers are looking in the right place. you share their skepticism, don't you? tell me why you think they may need to go back to the drawing board, jim. >> i never got assurance there was a strong scientific reason for taking the approach we are taking. i don't know what was the thinking involved when the decision was let's go south and ignore anything to the north. i don't think the idea of ignoring any part of a search like this because we don't know very much. it's one of these things that came up last week when someone made the statement we don't
CNN
May 19, 2014 11:00am PDT
correspondent richard quest and se cnn aviation analyst jeff wise. gentlemen, there has been a lot of back and forth, back and forth. who possesss the information? who can release it? here we have this possible news. richard, to you, is this a breakthrough potentially? >> yes, it is. my understanding is that the data is to be released. there have been backward and forward negotiations between inmarsat in the uk and the malaysian government and various other authorities basically setting out exactly what should be released it's fine to say "release a data." but once you start going down the road you have to work out, well, what is the data? if you've got 500 pages of satellite logs, how much of it's relevant, how much of it's not? who's best qualified to put it together into a package to be released. there's no point in throwing everything out there. most of it will be absolutely irrelevant and then you've got questions such as how much about the satellite do you really release? my understanding is the word is very clear from both sides as much as should be released as possible. it's just a
CNN
May 5, 2014 7:00pm PDT
something but not from the black box. since the beginning i but saying that. >> jeff wise, are you seeing all superior now? seriously, you have been saying -- i saved you for last. you have been saying this from all along. look at you. you have been questioning this data and now you have been proven, it appears, correct. >> i'm just take it all in. this is the moment i've been waiting for, to hear you say. that listen, no, look -- like ph, i really felt there were fundamental problems with the data. and i -- it just didn't seem to add up. and i think that, you know, it couldn't have gone either way. we don't know what is going on. the ocean is full of mysteries. but my hunch turned out to pan out. they are still searching down there. they still could find something. but i think, you know, they made a bad call and i think they made a bad call very publicly and that was an error of judgment. >> it was the inmarsat, they give you a longitude and not a lad tuesday and guess the latitude. >> it's mary who gets to go last. in our reporting at cnn, they did not have to do with the plane, the arr
CNN
Apr 29, 2014 10:00pm PDT
in jeff wise, the author of "extreme fear", the former department general and she's now an aviation attorney. les and jeffrey. i haven't said all of your names in so long all together, i was beginning to have withdrawal. so, jeffrey, you know you just heard david pope from geo residence, they claim to have what appears to be a wreckage of a plane. how are the searchers in perth reacting to this information? >> look, off the record, the assessment is it's technology. however, my understanding is that the wreckage is about 700 miles -- >> we' peer to be having trouble obviously with -- he he's in perth, australia and those things happen. do you think the searchers are taking this seriously, at least the australians? >> i think they do. they're releasing they data and their calculations. like you remember in school, they said, show you work. they've shown everyone what they did and why they think this is so and it sounds reasonable. we haven't gotten what we were looking for with the other data. so i think given what they've put forth and what they've explained, i think they have to go
CNN
May 19, 2014 7:00pm PDT
it in a presentable way. >> thank you. i appreciate you. i want to bring in my panel of experts, jeff wise, david soucie, cnn safety analyst and here with me in studio in the hot seat is jules jaffe. david, what do you make of this information that we just got from inmarsat? >> i think it's a result of all the hard work and the effort and the push from the families from voice 370, from the general public. it's a real testament to the fact that banding together and pushing for something can happen. it's critical information to have. it will do so much for verifying the information that we've gotten before as to where it is. i think is it fantastic. >> jeff, you have wanted this information to come out for a long time now. do you think that we will start to see new theories about what happened? >> the box is going to open and we get to look inside and see what this is all has meant for all these months. it could produce more theories and cancel out a lot of theories and able to have a much better understanding of what is going on. >> i want to follow up with you, jules. do you think that this is go
CNN
Apr 10, 2014 8:00am PDT
more than just all at once it's there, and all at once it's not. it doesn't work that way. >> jeff wise, this doesn't seem to pass the smell test for mary. what do you think? not to mention the fact we're only learning about it now, 34 days into this investigation. >> yeah, it's late. there's a bunch of problems. there's a bunch of reasons you wouldn't want to go down to 3,000 feet. for one plane, it takes a lot of energy to go down and come back up. they're not designed to go at such low altitude. also they burn a lot of fuel. you might be worried about the fact that passengers have got cell phones in their pockets. if you go to about 3,000 feet, you enable them to open their phones and call their relatives. obviously that didn't happen. so that also would lend me to doubt this report. the fact that it wasn't on radar doesn't necessarily mean it had to go so low to avoid. there's a bunch of reasons why you think it might not be on radar for a little while. >> it koob behind another plane? there could have been other things going on? >> sometimes radar just has gaps in it. it's sort of
CNN
May 3, 2014 7:00am PDT
they are hiding. >> steven, i want to bring in a few more people in the conversation. david soucie and jeff wise. gentlemen, you are hearing steven. how irresponsible the authorities would not release a thorough preliminary report and give some sort of explanation why military would not be involved and why this plane could go off radar for 17 minutes before anyone noticed or any action was taken. he has some strong points there. irresponsible, is that one word, jeff, you would use in all of this? >> well, it certainly has been an emotional roller coaster for the families. part of why it is difficult because information has been so scant. i think there is really one big elephant in the room that the authorities are going to have to deal with. that is that they have been telling the families their relatives are dead and they will never see them again, but they won't tell them why. they said it has to do with inmarsat data. they will not open the books and show the nature of this analysis that leads them to this conclusion. frankly, some very interesting information released in the preliminary repo
CNN
Apr 17, 2014 8:00am PDT
aviation analyst jeff wise is here and steven wallace is with us here, the former director of accident investigations at the faa. and i want to start with something that the acting malaysian transportation minister also said at that news conference, steven. he said officials might be forced to regroup, to reassess if they don't find any sign of anything on the ocean floor before long. those words, regroup and reassess, is that basically an admission that if they don't find anything within a week, they might be looking in the wrong place? >> i didn't really hang on those words so much. first of all, i think that really the australians and this tremendous international effort down there in australia is really doing the right thing. i think there is kind of a continual process of reassessing and regrouping where they, as the evidence becomes refined, they narrow the search area. you know, there were some glitches with this bluefin 21 where they maybe needed to adjust the depth that it was going to go to. so i didn't put a lot of weight on those words from the defense minister up there in
CNN
May 5, 2014 10:00pm PDT
to bring in jeff wise, mary schiavo, now an attorney for victims of transportation accidents. david soucie, and geoffrey thomas, editor in chief of airline ratings.com. and the man who led the search for the wreckage of air france flight 447. first to perth. we learned that data that searchers have relied on will be reviewed again to see if there are any flaws in their calculations. shouldn't this have been done all along? >> well, i think what has been happening, don, is they have been recalculating and the line we are looking is a 7/3 calculation of the inmarsat data. i believe that more information has come from various countries in southeast asia about what they may or nay not have seen. and this is helping to refine the search information. but we must remember that ocean shield has detected four springs from what they call the highest probability area. so i wonder in fact if they'll find anything new in this recalculation. >> four ping -- i'm wondering now if those pings can be false positives? everything we have -- they have searched this entire area. they have found nothing. now the
CNN
Apr 21, 2014 11:00pm PDT
of experts, jeff wise, mary schiavo, now an attorney for victims of transportation accidents. lieutenant colonel michael kay, a retired military pilot with the british air force and anthony roman, ceo of roman and associates, karlene petitt, author of "fight for control" and "flight for safety," and jeffrey thomas, editor in chief of airlineratings.com. good to see all of you. welcome to the week, it's monday now. bluefin-21 has already scanned two-thirds of the search zone. if it continues to find nothing, what is plan "b"? >> well, it's a very good question, don, and a question that everybody here in perth, western australia, is asking. look, they may well extend to one of the other pinger locations. they may move it and do another 10k radius around one of the other spots, but they are also looking at a wider strategy of other vehicles that they can bring to bear and perhaps a wider search with slightly less definition than the bluefin-21 gives, more of a broad brush stroke, if you like. they are all the parties of this investigation, this search, are now looking at those options, and
CNN
Apr 29, 2014 8:00am PDT
in the indian ocean. we'll delve into this conversation in a few minutes. jeff wise will join us again. >>> another big story we're following this morning, donald sterling will find out the cost of those racist comments that are attributed to him. this is a sample. >> people call you and tell you that i have black people on my instagram and it bothers you. >> yeah, it bothers me a lot. if you want to broadcast that you're associating with black people. >> in that recorded conversation with his then girlfriend, we allegedly also hear him say among many mother comments that african-americans aren't welcome at his games. hall of famer magic johnson in particular after she posted this picture with him on instagram. >> players, fans, civil rights leaders, even the president of the united states joined the chorus of courses vilifying these comments and everyone has been pushing for an investigation by the nba. in just a few hours, we'll learn the results of that investigation when the new commissioner of the nba gives a news conference at 2:00 p.m. eastern today. our dan simon is in los ange
CNN
Apr 14, 2014 8:00am PDT
that ang gus mentioned and if that promises to be any lead. jeff wise marc weiss and mary, to stick around also. you can tweet a question to mary and jeff. use the hashtag 370qs. we're on facebook/ @this hour. we're going to return to our coverage of the missing plane but let's look at a look at some other stories happening at this hour. >>> in kansas the federal government is looking into whether a federal hate crime law applies in the shooting of three people. people say frazier glen miller has tied to white supremacist groups. >>> pro-russian protestors have taken over goflt buildings in nine cities. the stalemate continues. >>> today a new wrinkle, ukraine's acting president is raising the possibility of a national referendum on keeping ukraine independent and united. >>> the necessatsb is trying toe out if fatigue, distraction or other issues led to that fiery crash in california that killed ten people. authorities are looking into the last 72 hours, into whether he had enough rest or perhaps he was using his cell phone when he plowed head on into a bus full of college students. ten p
CNN
May 6, 2014 10:00pm PDT
guests. jeff wise, mary. and mary, we will start with you. mary, many people that the disappearance of flight 370 is terrorist-related. mary, why do you think people believe that. >> well, the events of 9/11, underwear bomber and shoe bomber, they tend to think this is the same as that. but malaysia 370 doesn't have any of the hall marks of a terror attack and we know the malaysians are not treating it as a terror investigation. i will give you a couple of examples. last week was the first we heard they rounded up any terrorist suspects. 11 people or questioning. but made it clear they didn't think they had anything to do with 370. compare that with the united states after 9/11. airports closed. equipment seized. flight schools examined. not once, but twice. some cases, four times. pictures of the suspects flashed across the country. fbi had rewards for information. the two most important pieces of evidence that the case that spent 11 years litigating 9/11 showed up in plane brown envelopes in my desk. the people world over wanted to help with clues. and clues poured forth. we don't
CNN
May 10, 2014 3:00am PDT
. let's bring in some of our aviation analysts. jeff wise and miles o'brien. we can talk a bit more about the regulations involving the hot air balloons. we don't hear about these crashes every day, but a power line was within the landing area there and i imagine you might have something to say about what's the power line doing there. >> to you first, miles. >> first of all, the important thing to remember about hot air ballooning is it is unpredictable. you are flying literally on the wind. you may say you want to land somewhere, but the wind and mother nature may have another idea. it is important to be flexible in the world of ballooning and it is important to fly at the right time. hot air balloonists like to launch very early in the morning before the sun has kicked up a lot of disturbance and thus wind. it is also very important that you have a clear idea of what's on the ground. flying at dusk or near nightfall is not highly recommended because it can be very difficult to spot power lines. so, you know, i don't want to second guess every aspect about this flight, but what you
CNN
Apr 17, 2014 8:00pm PDT
. >> robert, it is your night tonight. the other night it was jeff wise's night. everyone gets a night where they get beat up here. jeff wise, you can tell him. >> can i jump in? >> yeah. i want to come to the aid of the afflicted here. i strongly disagree with richard quest. i love disagreeing with richard quest in principle. here i think richard, you are off base. the plane clearly did not turn itself on a westerly heading i. did not skirt the thai border the way it did. this is clearly under human control. i don't think that that is ambiguous. there's no accident -- look, the triple seven is an incredibly robust plane with a fantastic safety record. have to side on those. >> as the ring master, that's it for now. when we come back, a team of experts will answer your questions. more on this coming up. with diabetes, it's tough to keep life balanced. i don't always have time to eat like i should. and the more i focus on everything else, the less time i have to take care of me. that's why i like glucerna shakes. they have slowly digestible carbs to help minimize blood sugar spikes. glucerna
CNN
Apr 24, 2014 11:00am PDT
with us. thank you so much. and let's talk to cnn aviation analyst, jeff wise. you just heard my back and forth with richard. what's your reaction? >> it is really extraordinary. we are finally hearing from the horse's mouth, the prime minister's reaction to this extraordinary turn of events. richard is absolutely right. this is an historic unprecedented event. we are still scratching our heads. really i think the person who is in a position to understand this event better than anyone else because he has access. >> he is scratching his head. >> to hear him talk about how he couldn't believe that this plane could wind up half way to abo antarcti antarctica. we all feel absolute bafflement. >> we know that the families have been demanding more information, they are asking for a lot, so from this interview we have learned that the malaysian government will be finally releasing -- should have done it around the 30 day mark but they will finally be releasing the 30 day report. what kind of information will be contained in that that will be released to the public? >> frankly we don't know a
CNN
Apr 11, 2014 8:00am PDT
right i'm john berman here at cnn in new york. you have been watching president obama saying good-bye to health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius and the president is nominatie ining th secretary. the president talked about the role that sebelius has played at the center of one of the most important debates the affordable care act. he has his bumps and bruises from this debate and she has her bumps and bruises. and he pointed out that the country lost the first quarter on the website. but he also pointed out in his eyes it is the final score that matters here and he thinks the affordable care act the fact that 7.5 million people have signed up for it and noted that she will go down in history as the person who ran hhs, but the question is will she go down in history as a positive way or not. in saying good-bye, she lost a page in her address. a glitch that people will connect to the glitches with the website. getting a rapid confirmation in the senate. he noted that she was confirmed unanimously in her last post. all right ahead for us at this hour. >> we are very con
CNN
Apr 4, 2014 10:00pm PDT
for victims of transportation accidents. ocean explorer, tim taylor. jeff wise. jim tilmon. the batteries may already be dead. do you believe the data recorders will ever be found? >> if the pinger is dead and there's no debris on the surface and we're convinced it's along this southern arm, then what we're really facing is we would have to go down and try to locate this thing with side scan sonar, which is equivalent of riding around the continental united states on a horse looking for this thing. it's getting extremely slow process. if you deployed multiple underwater robots, this could take decades. >> tim taylor, how does a search plan change, if nothing is found within the next few days? >> well, they're going to have to take a long range look at this and really evaluate if they proceed. jeff said it's going to take a long time. that equates to money. i have one quick thing. sound has a different propensity, low frequency sound underwater, there's a channel from 2,000 to 4,000 feet that allows sound to travel great distances. it has a ricochet effect. maybe they're using this acoustic so
CNN
Apr 9, 2014 8:00am PDT
me, kr. in. nn aviation analyst, mary schiavo and jeff wise. we talked about this as a giant race against time. they needed to find this. today, it seems to me, there is a huge ship. it is no longer a race against time. th they have heard what they believe to be the pings. they seem to be taking their time before what is the next step, to put a submersible in the water to look for this thing on the ocean floor. explain this. >> i think what they are thinking is if they take a little extra time now, they will save a lot more time later, sort of like a stitch in time. what they want to do is narrow down their search area. first, the continental size and then texas. when they put the submersibles down, they can comb that area and map that area in a few days as opposed to a few weeks or a few months. they want to get every little last ounce out of those pingers, every last little juice, before they die. then, they will have a smaller area. jeff wi sechlt, he really did seem awfully optimistic. probably more than he was saying with his words, because he wanted to temper everything with
CNN
Apr 7, 2014 7:00pm PDT
of experts. bill nye, a former boeing engineer. mary schiavo, michael kay, jeff wise, the author of "extreme fear: the science of your mind in danger," jim tillman, a retired american airlines pilot. also, jeffrey thomas, editor and chief of airlineratings.com, and richard quest is back with me. why don't i start with you, richard. it's been 32 days in this search. the most promising lead so far. but how promising is this lead, do you think? >> it was very promising last night. optimistic, encouraging, all the words we heard. and tonight, commander marks, i think of the seventh fleet, who's been very much involved in keeping us informed, we spoke to him at length last night. he said he was less encouraged, because they haven't heard anything from this from the last 30-odd hours. and more than that, he said, started to suggest that as the pinger life span dwindles, he's looking now to when he hears the from the australians, when, what's the next path, when will they decide to use -- >> and possibly what we're going to hear at 11:00 eastern, in about 45 minutes. >> possibly, indeed. >> bill ny
CNN
May 1, 2014 8:00am PDT
're joined again by aviation analyst jeff wise. you're a pilot. you fly planes. you've been on a lot of flights presumably. that's a lot of time there. is that surprising to you, or are there other things that stick out to you in this report? >> well, i mean, listen. there's a lot in this report. it's not everything we would have hoped for, but there is a lot to chew over. you know, the 17 minutes, remember that one of the things that struck us initially as so interesting and potentially suspicious about the flight, the way it unfolded, is that the plane took this left turn around the time that it was disappearing from radar. remember, it was out over the ocean. it was away from the ground radar surveillance. and so this is where it would have disappeared anyway. so it's not so surprising that it took air traffic controllers to notice that it was -- something was amiss. so in a way, that's not so surprising to me, that it took a little while. it seems that the turn, if it was indeed made intentionally as malaysian authorities are assuming, then that would have been the perfect place
CNN
Apr 5, 2014 7:00am PDT
the pinger. >> jeff wise -- these things don't occur in nature. >> the pinging sound at this frequency we need to point out and it has been said all morning, it does not occur in nature. jeff wise, aviation analyst, what else could it be? if not from nature, if it's not from a black box, at 37.5 kilohertz, what else could this be? >> you did hear reports of a false positive -- false ping report. so it seems that this has happened before. we've had a false positive from paing pi pinger. i'd like to put a hat on what richard was saying that this is not how information should be released. when you're search for something, especially with a huge multi-national task force, you're going to have false positives. the key thing of the search authorities is to suppress false positives until they can be checked out in is a sketchy report at this point. we have to really be cautious and i think as richard said, this really shines a light on, you know, the flaws and how the organization is set up. and i don't blame the malaysians or the australians. i think the chinese are sort of doing their own thin
CNN
May 28, 2014 4:00pm PDT
their findings in the near future. erin? >> rene, thank you. now joining me richard quest, jeff wise and mary schiavo. it's been 83 days. these were the linchpin of much of the search the past two months. they've been looking because of these pings. this is a big development. >> it is. but you are excluding an area now. it is devastating that it's not there. but the important thing of course is they've discovered it's not there or that the pings are wrong after the event. am i making sense? it doesn't really matter now that we know they weren't the right pings because they've already searched the area. yes, it was a waste of time to search it, but now we know they weren't the pings, we can refocus and start to look at exactly where the search might perhaps move forward, which is back to the arcs. >> back to the, a based on the inmarsat data. >> yes. >> jeff, you've been very skeptical. not just to the inmarsat data conclusions, but of the pings themselves. >> right. >> everyone wants to find this plane. but your concerns have been justified now. >> right. i mean, basically, all along, i've be
CNN
Jul 19, 2014 3:00am PDT
it was recorded. let's talk about this with cnn analyst philip mudd and cnn analyst jeff wise. philip, when you hear those words, what is the first thing that comes to your head? >> a couple of things come to my head. validation from the u.s. side. do we have direct access to the ukrainians and what they have to determine the validity to that communication. the bigger issue is what we acquired from our communications intercept before and after the incident. let me make one clear comment here that we have not talked about. i was at ci for 25 years. i prepared the intelligence for iraq. i watched the disaster after iraq. when you put the president of the united states out in 2014 to talk about intelligence and talk about how certain we are this was a rebel-fired missile, you don't put him out there in the wake of the iraq debacle without some certainty that it was a rebel missile. when i heard what you just played, that suggests to me that the white house knows more than the president is saying. >> you would expect that if the ukrainians have this and it is authentic, the u.s., which has been inv
CNN
Jun 25, 2014 3:00am PDT
building. joining us to discuss all of this, jeff wise, cnn aviation and drone analyst, science writer and author of "extreme fear." mel robbins is also here, cnn commentator and legal analyst which is so important. let's start with you, mel. that seattle story, i think, if you were living in a skyscraper and tall building and see one of the drones go by and got out of shower or getting dressed or whatever, that's a real privacy concern. >> well, absolutely, here's what's interesting. when the technology advances we always think the laws need to advance, too, but the truth is the privacy laws are pretty simple. if you have a reasonable expectation of privacy and for anybody that lives in a high rise. if you're in a room where the shades are up and they face out, you don't have a reasonable expectation of privacy, believe it or not. >> we have an expectation but it's not reasonable. >> but if you're facing a river, absolute expectation. >> absolutely. >> if this woman is in her apartment and the window and shades are open and a neighbor could see her that lives in an adjacent building,
CNN
Apr 14, 2014 10:00pm PDT
to mh 370. hopefully we might know something within the next 24 hour on that. >> now to jeff wise here in new york. you know that blue fin had to come up before it finished the job today. six hours instead of 16 hours because it exceeded its depth. are searchers relying too heavily on one piece of technology in this part of the search, jeff? >> you know, when these, they use a similar technology to use air france 447 back in 2011, and at that time they had three of these devices working a search pattern together. it's not entirely clear to me, now that we're now several years later why there aren't more such submersibles available. i do understand these vehicles do exist. it would seem that this would be a fairly high priority task for them to be set upon. you know, hopefully, if we don't get results soon, maybe they'll be able to find more such devices to search the area. >> david, i'm going to ask you because we have moved into this next phase now. but the information that we got about the pings. is that really the best information that we have to date? and do you think the batteries
CNN
May 31, 2014 3:00pm PDT
bring in my panel to discuss all of this, jeff wise is a cnn aviation analyst and author. paul ginsburg is president of professional audio laboratories. welcome to all of you. paul, let me start with you on this one. if not the flight 370 pings, what were they? >> well, it's hard to tell because what we get is sort of filtered information. we get -- we get information that changes, whether it's the altitude, the heading, the transcri transcript, the composite recordings that they finally gave us and now whether or not we have pings. >> were they man-made hthen? >> we want to be on the ship and observing them and make that decision. it's hard to tell from what we're hearing. it just changes every day. >> it certainly does. david, you say there is certainly much debate about the nature of the pings. why is that? >> in the beginning there was because we didn't have enough evidence and no one on the outside had the actual data to look at. all reading between the lines on what has been released. so i think that is very normal that there would be some debate about what those pings were in the
CNN
Apr 17, 2014 11:00am PDT
. joining me now is cnn's aviation analyst jeff wise. author of "extreme fear." paul henry, former commander in the french navy and director of underwater research for premier exhibitions. thank you both for being with me today. and, jeff, out of the gate, i want to begin with you because the words we heard from that malaysian acting transport minister, you know, if the blue fin underwater drone continues to find nothing i heard reboot, reconsider, what might that mean? >> you know, that's a great question. i think we are going-to-have to wait and find out because, you know, we have been hearing so much positive language over the last few weeks from both the australians and malaysians we had solid leads, converging on the wreckage of the plane, and if nothing turns up, if all of the promises turn out to be empty, we are going to have to go back to square one because we don't have any active leads to pursue. and whether that is -- you know, looking at what area of the southern ocean to look at, we are backing up even further and saying, okay, what evidence do we have to believe that it is in
CNN
Apr 13, 2014 3:00am PDT
this area. >> so jeff wise, how confident are you that they'll find the wreckage with everything that keeps changing, information we get one day and it's changed the next day and all the modifications? do you get a sense they really have a handle on what they're doing? >> well, it doesn't really inspire confidence. they've gone ahead and reversed course and made the search area big again. that implies a certain lack of confidence on their part as to where exactly this debris should be if, in fact, the pings that have been located last week are, in fact, correlated to mh370. five days without a ping. you start to wonder at what point they throw in the towel and start scanning the seabed with sidescan sew far. >> you think it's time to do that? >> unless they have some other information that we're not aware of -- it seems like if they really did think this was the plane that they would try to go down and locate it. that's what we all want to have happen. >> michael kaye, we've been talking about why they haven't sent down this bluefin 21, this drone that can go down and search for that. what'
CNN
Apr 29, 2014 4:00pm PDT
there about an intact plane. joining me arthur rosenberg, les abend and jeff wise. what do you think, jeff? >> you know, it's very interesting of the timing of this coming out. because the australians' underwater search seems to have hit more or less of a dead-end. and now, there has always been theories that people have. i get a lot of e-mails and comments on my blog about oh, i saw this picture from a satellite photo. have i this reason to think it's over here. lots of people have lots of theories. now there is an explosion. and this is just one of hundreds. >> right. i mean, although they do have these images. let me, arthur, play for you what the ceo of this company said as to why they released the images to the public at this time. >> sure, sure. >> we're a large group of scientists, and we were being ignored. and we thought we had a moral obligation to get the finding out into the authorities. >> well, look. here is the bottom line. he said that to add gravitas to his analysis. this analysis, speck spectral analysis, from what i've been told it's based on the demilitarized russian mi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)